Ready for practice?

Don’t forget your Sports Physical and Immunizations!

  • If you need a sports physical, please call the Keokuk County Medical Clinic at (641) 622-1170 for an appointment.
  • Immunizations do not require an appointment.
  • Clinic hours are Monday through Friday 8-5.

Mask Guidelines Updated

Effective August 4, 2020, Keokuk County Health Center and Medical Clinic updated mask requirements. Below are the changes that will affect the community. Changes have also been put in place for staff.

  • Patients/visitors will continue to be screened upon entering the facility.
  • All patients/visitors over the age of 2 will be required to wear a mask while in the facility.
  • We ask that you bring your own mask from home. If you do not have a mask, one will be provided to you.
  • Hospitalized patients will not be required to wear a mask while in their rooms.
  • Patients/visitors presenting to the ER or Inpatient department will be given a surgical/procedure mask while in the facility and are required to wear it while they remain in the facility.
  • Therapy and Cardiac Rehab patients please notify staff if wearing a mask will hinder your ability to work with staff.
  • Vendors will wear either a cloth or surgical/procedure mask while in the facility.

Thanks for your patience during this time. We are in this together!

Cloth Masks

Wear your Mask Correctly

  • Wash your hands before putting on your mask
  • Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
  • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face
  • Make sure you can breathe easily
fitting a cloth facemask to your face. The mask should cover from below your chin to above your nose, and be pinched to fit the bridge of your nose snugly.
Image of people wearing masks correctly and other people wearing them incorrectly.

Wear a Mask to Protect Others

  • Wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth to help protect others in case you’re infected with COVID-19 but don’t have symptoms
  • Wear a mask in public settings when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when it may be difficult for you to stay six feet apart
  • Wear a mask correctly for maximum protection
  • Don’t put the mask around your neck or up on your forehead
  • Don’t touch the mask, and, if you do, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer to disinfect​

Follow Everyday Health Habits

  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick
  • Wash your hands often, with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds each time
  • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available
Illustration of two individuals with masks on standing 6 feet apart
Illustration of a person removing a face mask

Take Off Your Mask Carefully, When You’re Home

  • Untie the strings behind your head or stretch the ear loops
  • Handle only by the ear loops or ties
  • Fold outside corners together
  • Place mask in the washing machine (learn more about how to wash masks)
  • Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose, and mouth when removing and wash hands immediately after removing.

How to clean

Washing machine

  • You can include your mask with your regular laundry.
  • Use regular laundry detergent and the warmest appropriate water setting for the cloth used to make the mask.
illustration, washing machine

Washing by hand

  • Prepare a bleach solution by mixing:
    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) household bleach per gallon of room temperature water or
    • 4 teaspoons household bleach per quart of room temperature water
  • Check the label to see if your bleach is intended for disinfection. Some bleach products, such as those designed for safe use on colored clothing, may not be suitable for disinfection. Ensure the bleach product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser.
  • Soak the mask in the bleach solution for 5 minutes.
  • Rinse thoroughly with cool or room temperature water.
illustration, bleach and bucket

Make sure to completely dry mask after washing.

How to dry

Dryer

  • Use the highest heat setting and leave in the dryer until completely dry.
Illustration clothes in dryer

Air dry

  • Lay flat and allow to completely dry. If possible, place the mask in direct sunlight.
illustration, cloth masks hanging on a clothes line

SOURCE: www.cdc.gov; #stepupmaskupia

Salmonella Newport Outbreak Infections Linked to Onions

Illustration with a triangle and exclamation mark and text reading Food Safety Alert

Posted August 3, 2020 at 6:00 PM ET

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections linked to onions.

Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.

At A Glance

Various onions on a wooden table.

Do not eat, serve, or sell onions from Thomson International, Inc., or food made with these onions. Onion types include red, white, yellow, and sweet yellow varieties.

  • At home, check your refrigerator and kitchen for recalled onions or foods made with them, such as salads, wraps, tacos, sandwiches, etc.
    • Check the package or look for a sticker on the onion to see if it is from Thomson International, Inc., or one of the brand names below. If it is, don’t eat it. Throw it away.
      • Other brand names that may be on labels include: Thomson Premium, TLC Thomson International, Tender Loving Care, El Competitor, Hartley’s Best, Onions 52, Majestic, Imperial Fresh, Kroger, Utah Onions and Food Lion.
      • See the recall notice to check for further details and pictures of the products.
    • If you can’t tell where your onions are from, don’t eat them. Throw them away.
    • If you used onions to make any other food and don’t know where the onions were from, don’t eat the food.  Throw it away, even if no one got sick.
    • Wash and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packaging, such as countertops, refrigerator drawers, knives, and cutting boards.
  • When you eat out or shop for food, check with restaurants and grocery stores to make sure they are not serving or selling recalled onions from Thomson International, Inc., or foods prepared with them, such as salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas, and dips.
    • If they don’t know where their onions are from, don’t buy the product.
    • People sickened in this outbreak reported eating raw onions in freshly prepared foods, including salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas, and dips.

Take these steps if you have symptoms of a Salmonella infection:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
  • Report your illness to your local health department.
    • The health department will likely call you for an interview to ask you about foods you ate in the week before you got sick.
  • Assist public health investigators by answering their questions when they contact you.

Symptoms of Salmonella Infection

Illustration of a person with stomach pain.
  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 6 hours to 6 days after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • Children younger than 5 years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.
  • For more information, see Symptoms of Salmonella Infection.

SOURCE: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/newport-07-20/index.html

Laboratory News

Ansyl Samson, MT, Lab Manager,
standing by the Biosafety Cabinet
and equipment used for the
COVID-19 Molecular (PCR) Testing.

In March of 2020, KCHC installed a certified Class II Biosafety Cabinet in the laboratory with money received from COVID-19 grant/stimulus funds. This equipment allows staff to confidently conduct procedures and manipulate the types of specimens which have a high likelihood of generating aerosols and droplets. The biosafety cabinet has been especially welcome during the current pandemic.

KCHC offers COVID-19 Molecular (PCR) testing offers in-house with quick turn-around results. The chemicals needed to perform this test are in short supply therefore testing is limited to 1) individuals being admitted to the hospital, 2) individuals requiring placement to another facility, and 3) individuals requiring clearance for in-house procedures such as colonoscopies.